That Blending Painting… – Science Lessons 54 & 56

Surprisingly, as I found out, lessons 54 and 56, 54 being paint a tree and 56 a landscape, I apparently did both in the painting shown above.  Of course, it’s too bad that this assignment is in the final two weeks of Art.  I hope to be posting more about these seemingly “abandoned” subjects, like food.  Anyways, see you soon, everyone!

Oh, and to everyone that’s followed me: Thank you very much!

thank-you-poster

Science Lesson 60- Almost done with Art.

Hello everybody! It’s me again, and I did a couple paintings while I was gone.  The one above is one out of two that I did, the one above being a sunset in a field, while the other one, below, is of, well a deer on a dirt road in a forest.  So far, I’ve learned a lot about drawing, like the elements of both art and sketching (which are pretty much the same thing),  How to draw a 3-d object, and a couple other useful tidbits. I also learned a good bit about what art means, and while studying art, I was introduced to a couple of artists. I think that my favorite statement was from Gustave Courbet, and it was, “Show me an angel and I’ll paint one.”

first-painting

Anyways, I am almost done with Art School and will be going into Rocket Science (you heard me right, it’s seriously Rocket Science) soon, in about a week or maybe two. Anyways, one last thing:art-poster

🙂 I love that poster

Science lesson 55 – City in Two- Point Perspective

For those of you who remember the photo above on the “A Couple Sketches” post, I decided to take it out and make a whole post on it, as well as the next lesson’s sketch.  And for those of you who don’t know what two-point perspective is, it’s where the lines dissappear on the horizon on two points, like say, a row of buildings.  Look in the pic above.  Try looking where all the lines stop.  Two points, right? Those are vanishing points.  Those vanishing points are how the technique gets its name: Two– as in the two vanishing points- Point– as in the vanishing Points– perspective- as in the way you see the end result.

Trees  and fields

This other pic was also on the post beneath, but at the very end of the post.  This one is focused on the tone of the graphite creating a 3-d effect. Note that the lighter shades suggest farther back, and therefore make it realistic.

A Couple Sketches – Science Lessons 45-54

Today I will be posting a couple sketches that I sketched in the lessons.

My try at a 3-D tree, Sphere, and Rock.
My try at a 3-D tree, Sphere, and Rock.
An attempt at a computer with a fullscreen video playing. See if you can recognise the drawing.
An attempt at a computer with a fullscreen video playing. See if you can recognise the drawing.
Second try at a computer
Second try at a computer
EPSON MFP image
Drawing of a roll of paper towels
hand
hand
Hand and Spheres
Hand and Spheres
EPSON MFP image
row of houses in single point perspective
First try at the house Heh
First try at the house
Heh
EPSON MFP image
crossroads attempt in two point
random circles & lines
random circles & lines
Cup
Cup
Father & son near a fruit basket, the son reaching for a fruit and talking
Father & son near a fruit basket, the son reaching for a fruit and talking
Cats
Cats
Jars on shelves
Jars on shelves
Pot and Mortar
Pot and Mortar

That’s a couple of my sketches.

Doodle Faces!- Science Lesson 44

In this lesson I made doodle faces and patterns!  I watched some videos on doodling expressions and patterns.  Then I got to draw them, and I made up the faces above. Theirs were nice, and rate mine below, in the comments!  You can also do this, the link is the words, “expressions” and “patterns”.

EPSON MFP image

Elements of Art; Science Lesson 43

Sorry for just simply skipping into the art, I was just so excited! I forgot to post that I was moving on to a new unit, and just sped through the sketching and drawing part. In the Sketching part of unit 2; Art.  So here I’ll summarize lesson 1 on art.

To make art, the first thing you have to know the elements of art: Line, Shape, Form, Value, Space, Color, and Texture. Lines can be squiggly, straight, long, short, jagged, thin, bold, round, or even all of these things.  Each artist and person has a different way to make a line, and even how they turn out is like a signature.

Shapes are the forms created when lines join and create an enclosed space between these lines.  Shapes can be large or small, round or straight, and the lines that make up the shape define it.  They are a major part in art, and almost any imaginable object can broken down into the common shapes of rectangle, circle, square, triangle, cylinder, cube, sphere, and pyramid.

Form is the part of art that will define the whole of what you put on the paper. It defines the shape of a line, the shape of, well, a shape, and everything except itself, value, color, texture, and space.

Value is the shade that the color is being used in, and can define the feel of the picture, like Thomas Cole’s Voyage of Life, circa 1842.  Note that he uses darker shades to depict torment, suffering, and sadness, and lighter tones to show happiness and morality.

Space is the distance between two objects or their placement in the landscape.  This can also be used to separate two or more objects without using a border, so it acts like an invisible border.  By taking advantage of Space, you can make a 3-D landscape by showing space between the objects and making them smaller as they’re farther back.  Value can also be very useful when doing this, as they get farther back, you can draw them in a lighter shade and suggest that they’re farther back.

Color is the part that can really affect your picture.  Adding color can completely change the mood of the picture, make it look more real, and so forth.  This Element can create texture, form, and above all, feelings.

Texture is the sight or feel of the Drawing, and if a rough texture is used for, like, say, the bark of an oak tree, then the onlooker will view the tree as a rough, old tree. Sometimes, the painter will layer the paint to create actual texture and actually create a little bit of shape and form.  These types of paintings are made for touch, and are very interesting.  Using texture can also allow you to have one thing bulge out, and be the center of attention.

These elements of art are useful in both sketching and painting, and when combined, can make an angelic or devilish painting, depending on the Value.