H6 W19 History Review Essay

In the past week I learned about the major battles in the Persian Wars, and I had a little bit of a break about in the middle where I learned about Esther (whose name was apparently Hadassah).  My writing assignment today is to summarize the life of Esther (Hadassah).  So here goes…

King Ahasuerus (Xerxes) called a 180 day feast in celebration of going to conquer Greece, and he called for his queen, Vashti.  She refused to come, and he had her exiled, as he was probably on a lot of wine.  So he did that and decided to marry a new queen.  He ordered all the young women in the city at the time to come to the palace, to be viewed by the king.  One of these women was named Hadassah, or, in Persian, Esther.  All the women were allowed to put on jewelry, silk, and gold to make themselves more appealing to the king.  Esther took only a silk dress and earrings.  Despite less jewelry, the king liked Hadassah the most and had her made his queen.  It would all end happily here, if not for Haman, the king’s advisor.  He saw Mordecai, Esther’s cousin not give Haman the respect he thought required – and in turn, asked the king to make a decree proclaiming that all Jews were to be killed on an appointed day, and the Persians got to take the Jews’ belongings.  Xerxes agreed, giving Haman the signet ring to sign it.  Mordecai saw this decree, and warned Esther.  She in turn approached the king, asking if he and Haman could dine with her that night.  They agreed, and they ate dinner together.  At the end of dinner, she asked them to do it again in a week.  They did so, and that’s when she revealed Haman’s plot and that she herself was a Jew.  Xerxes was furious at this, and hanged Haman for it, and the Jews fought back and were saved, as another decree had been posted after Haman’s hanging, and it told Jews to fight back.  And that is the story of Esther.

Histeory Review #18

This week, I learned about the lives and accomplishments of the Persian kings Cyrus and Darius, and the prophets Ezra and Nehemiah.  I am supposed to write on the life  and achievements of one of them.  I chose Darius, so he’s the one I’ll write about today.

Darius the Great started out as a simple wealthy noble, a descendant of both Cyrus and Cambyses.  He used this ancestry to gain a claim to the throne of Persia.  He also had a lot of support to sit on the throne as he was a cousin to most of the other nobles, and those he weren’t cousins with recognized his military skill.  Once on the throne, he started by boosting the economy with better roads, a form of money called the Daric, and repairing public PoI’s (Points of Interest).  He then created a hierarchy with satraps (governors).  Each satrap had a different area that he governed, and they were not to fight.

Finished with the economy, he started taking land from other countries, starting with Babylon. He afterwards attacked Scythia, and failed miserably.  This first defeat stole his appetite for victory and conquest.  He didn’t attack anywhere in eastern Europe for a good long time.

The next few events  were the Ionian Rebellion.  The Greeks were tired of being under Persian control, and so they rebelled against Persia.  The Rebellion lasted about five years, or until the Persians won.  this returned Darius’ taste for victory, and he tried to take all of Greece.   He planned to invade by sea, but the Greeks saw it coming and crushed his fleet before it got even a league away from the target shore.  The next battle picked with the Greeks, renowned as one of the most important battles in BC history, the Battle of Marathon, is the last one he tried with the Greeks, literally destroyed his army and naval fleet, only a few years before the end of the reign of Darius the Great.

Three Great Greek Characters – History Week 17 Review

Three Great Greek Characters – History Week 17 Review

In today’s essay, I’m supposed to summarize the lives of three great Greek characters, of whom I chose a philosopher, a mathematician, and a scientist.

The Philosopher was named Aristotle, who was born in Stagirus, Chalcidice.  He was never really a citizen, despite living near Athens most of his life.  His father was a court doctor (or physician), and Aristotle therefore could join Plato’s Academy, where he remained until Pluto died.  Then he went off on his own to teach, and teach he did, after fleeing Assos, he taught…Alexander the Great.  Then he went home to found a school, which he called the Lyceum.  Then as his students learned in a classroom, his other followers would walk around behind him as he taught.  Then Alex died and the Macedonian protection died out, giving others a chance to kill Aristotle.  So, they charged him, and his followers ran away with him.  He died the next year at age 62.

Next up is Eratosthenes.   He is best remembered for calculating the circumference of the Earth, and the Diameter.  He is also said to have created the Sieve of Eratosthenes, which singles out Prime Numbers.  He also was the one to create leap day, calculate the distance of the earth from the sun, and revise the Iliad.  We don’t really have much info on his life.

Lastly, since you can’t have an essay on Greek figures without Archimedes, here is his story.  He was born in Syracuse in about 287 BC, He was considered the most widely known Greek mathematician (mathmagician, I should say), and invented modern Calculus, and the Exhaustive method.  He also estimated the value of pi most accurately.  Although we know all this, he did not really leave a nice, well-laid-out biography for us, so I don’t really know his story.

That’s all I have for today on Aristotle, Eratosthenes, and Archimedes!

Three Great Greek Characters – History Week 17 Review

In today’s essay, I’m supposed to summarize the lives of three great Greek characters, of whom I chose a philosopher, a mathematician, and a scientist.

The Philosopher was named Aristotle, who was born in Stagirus, Chalcidice.  He was never really a citizen, despite living near Athens most of his life.  His father was a court doctor (or physician), and Aristotle therefore could join Plato’s Academy, where he remained until Pluto died.  Then he went off on his own to teach, and teach he did, after fleeing Assos, he taught…Alexander the Great.  Then he went home to found a school, which he called the Lyceum.  Then as his students learned in a classroom, his other followers would walk around behind him as he taught.  Then Alex died and the Macedonian protection died out, giving others a chance to kill Aristotle.  So, they charged him, and his followers ran away with him.  He died the next year at age 62.

Next up is Eratosthenes.   He is best remembered for calculating the circumference of the Earth, and the Diameter.  He is also said to have created the Sieve of Eratosthenes, which singles out Prime Numbers.  He also was the one to create leap day, calculate the distance of the earth from the sun, and revise the Iliad.  We don’t really have much info on his life.

Lastly, since you can’t have an essay on Greek figures without Archimedes, here is his story.  He was born in Syracuse in about 287 BC, He was considered the most widely known Greek mathematician (mathmagician, I should say), and invented modern Calculus, and the Exhaustive method.  He also estimated the value of pi most accurately.  Although we know all this, he did not really leave a nice, well-laid-out biography for us, so I don’t really know his story.

That’s all I have for today on Aristotle, Eratosthenes, and Archimedes!

Summary of a Greek Myth – History Week 16 Review

In the past week, I have been learning about Greek culture. Today’s essay is on Greek myths, or, more specifically, a summary of one. So…Here goes nothing!

A long, long time ago, a young boy named Jason was sent off to the centaur Chiron, half-horse and half-man. He was then raised by Chiron because his real father had been killed by his uncle and the uncle had taken the throne. King Pelias was scared that Jason might reappear someday, and so he asked the great Talking Oak for advice. It said, “Beware the man that wears one sandal.” So, he had set guards out on the gates to watch for someone when only wore one sandal. In the meantime, Jason had left and was now traveling to the city Iolchos, where Pelias reigned. While on the way there, and old woman came along, and pitying her, carried her across the river in front of them. He then lost one of his sandals in the flooding river. Once across, he kept headed toward Iolchos. When he arrived at Iolchos, he was then pointed at by a child and then called ‘the one-sandaled man’ by the people, and he was brought before the king. Pelias then challenged Jason to retrieve the Golden Fleece. Jason then confronted the Talking Oak, which told him to take a branch, have a figurehead carved from it, and have a ship built. He had these things done, and then he asked where he would get the men to row the ship. It told him to summon 50 of the heroes of Greece, and take them with him. Once on, he asked the figurehead how they would move the ship, as it was too heavy for Hercules himself to row it (Hercules was one of the heroes summoned). The figurehead told Orpheus (who was better at his harp than at strength) to play his harp, he did, and the ship moved away from the beach.

On the way, they had many adventures, which I cannot recount right now. However, the Argonauts (as the name of the ship was the Argo) did arrive, and were called to the king’s court. He granted it to them on one condition: they defeat his barriers. His challenges were to harness and plow a field with two fire-breathing oxen, plant the teeth of the dragon, and then defeat the dragon guarding the fleece. For the Oxen of Fire, the king’s daughter Medea (who was also an enchantress,) gave him a potion to rub all over his skin and he would be fireproof. He then did so, plowed the field, completed the Dragon’s teeth challenge, and then went up to steal the Fleece. Now the Enchantress Medea made a potion for an arrow that would both pierce a dragon’s scales, and put it to sleep. Jason then grabbed the fleece and ran, telling the sons of the North Wind to go and tell the other Argonauts (because they could fly) and got on the ship, stealing away with both Medea (who had fallen in love with Jason) and the Fleece. They returned to Iolchos, and Jason, going up to the king, showed him the Golden Fleece, and killing Pelias, became the next king of Iolchos.

That’s my summary of a Greek Myth. I hope you liked it!!

Athenian Lifestyle – History Week 15 Review

Athenian Lifestyle – History Week 15 Review
A long time ago, a place called Greece housed two major cities one named Athens and the other Sparta. They both were growing quickly, and both making huge changes in Greek life, including pioneering new types of government. Their major difference, however, was in the way they treated family loyalty and love. Today’s essay will explain the difference between Athens’s and Sparta’s view of family loyalty and breeding.
In Athens, Marriage and Birth were highly encouraged simply to keep the family name going. The women had their marriage arranged, and normally had to put up with whoever was chosen for them.
In Sparta, marriage and birth were encouraged for the state – in other words, Sparta only wanted a military, and no family loyalty. Athens thought family loyalty a strength, Sparta a weakness. Athens thought women were ok to be seen in public with the husband. Sparta thought not. Athens thought that public weddings were ok. Sparta, again, disagreed.
In short, Athens’s and Sparta’s cultures were pretty much opposite. Extremely simply, that summarizes Athenian and Spartan differences.