Three Great Greek Characters – History Week 17 Review

Three Great Greek Characters – History Week 17 Review

In today’s essay, I’m supposed to summarize the lives of three great Greek characters, of whom I chose a philosopher, a mathematician, and a scientist.

The Philosopher was named Aristotle, who was born in Stagirus, Chalcidice.  He was never really a citizen, despite living near Athens most of his life.  His father was a court doctor (or physician), and Aristotle therefore could join Plato’s Academy, where he remained until Pluto died.  Then he went off on his own to teach, and teach he did, after fleeing Assos, he taught…Alexander the Great.  Then he went home to found a school, which he called the Lyceum.  Then as his students learned in a classroom, his other followers would walk around behind him as he taught.  Then Alex died and the Macedonian protection died out, giving others a chance to kill Aristotle.  So, they charged him, and his followers ran away with him.  He died the next year at age 62.

Next up is Eratosthenes.   He is best remembered for calculating the circumference of the Earth, and the Diameter.  He is also said to have created the Sieve of Eratosthenes, which singles out Prime Numbers.  He also was the one to create leap day, calculate the distance of the earth from the sun, and revise the Iliad.  We don’t really have much info on his life.

Lastly, since you can’t have an essay on Greek figures without Archimedes, here is his story.  He was born in Syracuse in about 287 BC, He was considered the most widely known Greek mathematician (mathmagician, I should say), and invented modern Calculus, and the Exhaustive method.  He also estimated the value of pi most accurately.  Although we know all this, he did not really leave a nice, well-laid-out biography for us, so I don’t really know his story.

That’s all I have for today on Aristotle, Eratosthenes, and Archimedes!

Three Great Greek Characters – History Week 17 Review

In today’s essay, I’m supposed to summarize the lives of three great Greek characters, of whom I chose a philosopher, a mathematician, and a scientist.

The Philosopher was named Aristotle, who was born in Stagirus, Chalcidice.  He was never really a citizen, despite living near Athens most of his life.  His father was a court doctor (or physician), and Aristotle therefore could join Plato’s Academy, where he remained until Pluto died.  Then he went off on his own to teach, and teach he did, after fleeing Assos, he taught…Alexander the Great.  Then he went home to found a school, which he called the Lyceum.  Then as his students learned in a classroom, his other followers would walk around behind him as he taught.  Then Alex died and the Macedonian protection died out, giving others a chance to kill Aristotle.  So, they charged him, and his followers ran away with him.  He died the next year at age 62.

Next up is Eratosthenes.   He is best remembered for calculating the circumference of the Earth, and the Diameter.  He is also said to have created the Sieve of Eratosthenes, which singles out Prime Numbers.  He also was the one to create leap day, calculate the distance of the earth from the sun, and revise the Iliad.  We don’t really have much info on his life.

Lastly, since you can’t have an essay on Greek figures without Archimedes, here is his story.  He was born in Syracuse in about 287 BC, He was considered the most widely known Greek mathematician (mathmagician, I should say), and invented modern Calculus, and the Exhaustive method.  He also estimated the value of pi most accurately.  Although we know all this, he did not really leave a nice, well-laid-out biography for us, so I don’t really know his story.

That’s all I have for today on Aristotle, Eratosthenes, and Archimedes!

Summary of a Greek Myth – History Week 16 Review

In the past week, I have been learning about Greek culture. Today’s essay is on Greek myths, or, more specifically, a summary of one. So…Here goes nothing!

A long, long time ago, a young boy named Jason was sent off to the centaur Chiron, half-horse and half-man. He was then raised by Chiron because his real father had been killed by his uncle and the uncle had taken the throne. King Pelias was scared that Jason might reappear someday, and so he asked the great Talking Oak for advice. It said, “Beware the man that wears one sandal.” So, he had set guards out on the gates to watch for someone when only wore one sandal. In the meantime, Jason had left and was now traveling to the city Iolchos, where Pelias reigned. While on the way there, and old woman came along, and pitying her, carried her across the river in front of them. He then lost one of his sandals in the flooding river. Once across, he kept headed toward Iolchos. When he arrived at Iolchos, he was then pointed at by a child and then called ‘the one-sandaled man’ by the people, and he was brought before the king. Pelias then challenged Jason to retrieve the Golden Fleece. Jason then confronted the Talking Oak, which told him to take a branch, have a figurehead carved from it, and have a ship built. He had these things done, and then he asked where he would get the men to row the ship. It told him to summon 50 of the heroes of Greece, and take them with him. Once on, he asked the figurehead how they would move the ship, as it was too heavy for Hercules himself to row it (Hercules was one of the heroes summoned). The figurehead told Orpheus (who was better at his harp than at strength) to play his harp, he did, and the ship moved away from the beach.

On the way, they had many adventures, which I cannot recount right now. However, the Argonauts (as the name of the ship was the Argo) did arrive, and were called to the king’s court. He granted it to them on one condition: they defeat his barriers. His challenges were to harness and plow a field with two fire-breathing oxen, plant the teeth of the dragon, and then defeat the dragon guarding the fleece. For the Oxen of Fire, the king’s daughter Medea (who was also an enchantress,) gave him a potion to rub all over his skin and he would be fireproof. He then did so, plowed the field, completed the Dragon’s teeth challenge, and then went up to steal the Fleece. Now the Enchantress Medea made a potion for an arrow that would both pierce a dragon’s scales, and put it to sleep. Jason then grabbed the fleece and ran, telling the sons of the North Wind to go and tell the other Argonauts (because they could fly) and got on the ship, stealing away with both Medea (who had fallen in love with Jason) and the Fleece. They returned to Iolchos, and Jason, going up to the king, showed him the Golden Fleece, and killing Pelias, became the next king of Iolchos.

That’s my summary of a Greek Myth. I hope you liked it!!

Science Lesson 128 – On-Camera Flash – Sorry about the lateness!!

On-camera Flash – Lesson 128

All cameras have a flash, that’s assured. DSLRs have a pop-up flash on top, Digitals have a built-in switch on flash, phones have a built-in flash next to the lens.   However, only DSLRs have the option of an on-camera flash.   These flashes are not built-in, and all that’s needed is a DSLR camera with an on-camera flash option.  Pretty much any DSLR has it, especially Canon and Nikon (who also make the majority of the on-camera flashes).   Why on-camera?   Normally, there’s a pop-up flash on the top of the camera, but the downside to these are that they are relatively small source of light, exaggerating shadows, and they are pretty short, so if you have a large lens the pop-up is too short and there is a large shadow on the bottom of the photo created by the lens size.  An on-camera flash is tall so it eliminates the shadow of the lens and the on-camera flash can swivel, allowing you to bounce the flash off the wall, decreasing he highlighted shadows.  Btw, there’s a little click area that tells the flash to decrease the flash power, so if you’re shooting up close and personal, it can fit into the click on the side and it will automatically decrease the flash power.   There is no better solution to lighting in photography than an on-camera flash!

 

Athenian Lifestyle – History Week 15 Review

Athenian Lifestyle – History Week 15 Review
A long time ago, a place called Greece housed two major cities one named Athens and the other Sparta. They both were growing quickly, and both making huge changes in Greek life, including pioneering new types of government. Their major difference, however, was in the way they treated family loyalty and love. Today’s essay will explain the difference between Athens’s and Sparta’s view of family loyalty and breeding.
In Athens, Marriage and Birth were highly encouraged simply to keep the family name going. The women had their marriage arranged, and normally had to put up with whoever was chosen for them.
In Sparta, marriage and birth were encouraged for the state – in other words, Sparta only wanted a military, and no family loyalty. Athens thought family loyalty a strength, Sparta a weakness. Athens thought women were ok to be seen in public with the husband. Sparta thought not. Athens thought that public weddings were ok. Sparta, again, disagreed.
In short, Athens’s and Sparta’s cultures were pretty much opposite. Extremely simply, that summarizes Athenian and Spartan differences.